First Year Programs

Departments offer their own array of first year courses. In addition, the Faculty of Arts offers three unique study options to students entering first-year.

Arts One Program

artsone.arts.ubc.ca

The Arts One Program offers an innovative approach to first year where students choose one of two thematic groups, each led by a dynamic team of instructors from a variety of academic disciplines. Each group has its own theme and a reading list of substantial texts. In Arts One, students enjoy an integrated approach to the humanities that focuses on critical thinking, writing skills, and class participation. Arts One provides students with an opportunity to study great works from a variety of perspectives and the added advantage of being part of a small learning community during their first year. Arts One satisfies 18 credits comprising first-year English, History, and Philosophy, leaving students with the ability to complete their first year with 12 credits of electives.

Coordinated Arts Program

cap.arts.ubc.ca

The Co-ordinated Arts Program, or CAP, is a first-year program that offers students an introduction to core humanities and social sciences disciplines in Arts through 18 credits of coursework linked by a common theme. Each of six thematic streams in CAP can accommodate a cohort of up to 100 students and each cohort is divided into groups of 25 for the ASTU 100 seminar component so that students experience a small learning community within which they can explore topics in an integrated manner from different academic perspectives.

Arts Studies in Research and Writing

asrw.arts.ubc.ca

Arts Studies in Research and Writing supports undergraduate students’ participation in the research culture of our UBC community. At a research-intensive university like UBC, students have the opportunity to learn how new knowledge is being produced, disseminated, and applied across many disciplines. Whether English is the first or fourth language of a student, all our students must acquire the language of their majors and learn how to use it in both speech and writing. Our goal, therefore, is to facilitate students’ development of academic literacy over the course of their studies. We do so by introducing students to disciplinary discourses through courses such as ASTU 150, by assisting and supporting faculty in mounting Research and Writing Intensive courses in Arts and Science disciplines, and by fostering undergraduate participation in a variety of student-led scholarly activities. Students in ASTU 150 will read scholarly journal articles representing at least three disciplines that all focus on aspects of a common topic. Through reading, students will see how researchers frame questions about a topic, select methods, and analyze and interpret their findings in ways that are specific to disciplines, and they will take a turn in this scholarly conversation through writing their own research papers.

Please visit the Arts Studies in Research and Writing page for further information and to find out more about the ASTU 150 course: “Arts Studies in Writing.”

International Program at UBC Vantage College

If you are an international student interested in applying for the Bachelor of Arts but do not yet meet UBC’s English Language Admission Standard, you should consider the International Program at UBC Vantage College. This 12-month program is equivalent to the first year of an Arts degree, and upon successful completion you will be able to transition directly into the second year of your Bachelor of Arts program at UBC. For program information and admission requirements, visit the International Program website.

If you have been admitted to the International Program at UBC Vantage College, advisors in the college will support you throughout the program. Please visit the UBC Vantage College website for more information for new students.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

Faculty of Arts
Buchanan A240
1866 Main Mall,
Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1, Canada

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